William and Elizabeth Mason Residence

4306 Arthur Drive
Delta, BC

Built: circa 1922
 

The Mason Residence is a one-storey Late Craftsman bungalow located south of Ladner village on the east side of Arthur Drive in the context of other late nineteenth and early twentieth century houses. It is distinctive for its side-gabled roof and projecting front porch.

Status: Still Standing

Mason Residence - 2008
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It was built in 1922 or 1923 for Mrs, Rhoda Devereaux. who also owned the house next door to the south. In the summer of 1924, she sold this house to William and Elizabeth Mason and moved into the village where she operated a maternity home.

The Masons who had farmed at Gulfside made their home here with their two daughters, Betty and Joan. After William's death shortly after their move in 1924 and Elizabeth's passing in 1929, the daughters continued to live here for some years. In 1942, they moved into accommodations in Ladner village provided by Betty's employer BC Tel and rented out the house. This bungalow became the home of Fred and Florence Arthur in the mid 1950s, a few years after they retired from active farming on Parmiter Road, which is now called 34B Street.

The house is small, like the Bishop cottages to the north, but it has a full basement. At some point in its life, the front porch was enclosed.

Character-Defining Elements

Key elements that define the heritage character of the Mason Residence include its:

  • location on Arthur Drive, south of Ladner village
  • residential form, scale and massing, as expressed by its one-storey plus full basement height, and side-gabled roof with projecting front porch
  • wood-frame construction, including narrow lapped wooden siding, covered by later asbestos siding, and cedar shingles at the foundation
  • late influence of the Craftsman style, including a front porch with square columns, and open soffits with exposed rafter tails
  • internal red-brick chimney
  • wooden sash windows, such as three-over-one and six-over-one multi-paned casements, in double and triple assembly
  • associated landscape features, including mature deciduous and coniferous trees and hedge screen